<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, May 11, 2011 at 11:15 AM, Stephen Gregory <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:nslug@kernelpanic.ca">nslug@kernelpanic.ca</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Wed, May 11, 2011 at 09:16:27AM -0300, D G Teed wrote:<br>
<br>
> There are SATA connectors for only 2 drives on the mainboard<br>
> and they are not hot swappable.<br>
<br>
</div>Are you sure? Any SATA I have used is hot swappable even if you have<br>
to pull the cable. You may need to force a rescan to find the new<br>
drives. I use rescan-scsi-bus.sh tool from Debian's scsitools package.<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br>I should have clarified, they are not practically hot swappable in our 1U system,<br>as the box is a rebuild - was once SCSI with a backplane and is now<br>SATA with no backplane.  If it is like most systems these days, it screams and<br>
shuts down if the case lid is removed.<br><br>I'm playing around with some new 1 TB SATA drives at home and found<br>hot swap was supported, but the device came back as /dev/sdc<br>rather than /dev/sdb - automatically handled by the kernel.<br>
rescan-scsi-bus.sh didn't work for SATA, but didn't need the <br>scan to get the new device live.<br> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

<br>
I don't think you will need a live cd to reinstall grub. You should be<br>
able to do it after you copy the data. You may need to chroot into<br>
the new array and install grub to hd0 and hd1 so you should hit your<br>
new drive.<br></blockquote><div><br>I was thinking rescue cd to move / and other partitions with files<br>that don't copy well while the system is up.<br> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

<br>
To save some headaches I would recommend that you modify the new<br>
/etc/fstab to use UUID= instead of /dev/mdXX as the md devices might<br>
change.<br>
<br></blockquote><div>Yes, Debian 6 has converted my fstab lines already, and likewise for mdadm.conf<br><br>Partitioning has come up as an issue I was not aware of before.  They require<br>partitions to be on certain boundaries with the Western Digital "Advanced Format"<br>
and the move to 4KB blocksize.  Western Digital's info on it for Linux is rather lean.<br>I found a nice page telling us how to do the math in fdisk and illustrating<br>the performance difference in having the partitions sitting at the right<br>
boundaries.<br><br><a href="%20http://linuxconfig.org/linux-wd-ears-advanced-format"> http://linuxconfig.org/linux-wd-ears-advanced-format</a><br></div></div><br>Note how when using multiple partitions, the next start block must be 8 greater<br>
than the previous end block.  This becomes a gap of 64 with logical partitions,<br>including a gap of 64 prior to the first partition in the extended partition.<br><br>Is there something like this happening with Seagate or others?<br>
<br><br>