[nSLUG] Re programming language choice

Oliver Doepner odoepner at gmail.com
Fri Feb 28 22:54:26 AST 2014


Polyglot, not sure. I am only bilingual. I can do bash and Java. :o)

I had to do a little Ruby/Rails in the recent past and a little Perl in the
distant past.

Polyglot can also mean: Knows a little bit of many languages, but isn't
expert in any. I prefer working with experts and it is ok with me if
developers have to be specialists to maintain expert level in a few areas.
:o)

Each of the programming "ecospheres" (Java/JEE, HTML5/web/mobile, LAMP,
Unix shell, DotNet, C/C++, etc.) is so full of sub-technologes, libraries,
cool new frameworks that I find it hard or impossible to maintain expert
status in more than one of them.

Cheers
Oliver




On Fri, Feb 28, 2014 at 12:48 PM, Ben Armstrong <synrg at sanctuary.nslug.ns.ca
> wrote:

> On 28/02/14 12:32 PM, Jim Haliburton wrote:
> > If the "newbie" was hired for his skill in the particular language that
> they knew, then
> > management should listen to their views.  If it was for a generic skill
> set management has to
> > consider if the new outsider is going to try and change the company to
> his way of doing things.
>
> As for the rest of your wisdom learned through experience, I can't
> disagree. However, so far as it is possible, management should strive to
> hire polyglots instead, who tend to be smarter anyway. Then decide which
> language to use based on longer term factors than who you happen to have
> on your staff at this point in time. Surely that will change over time ...
>
> Ben
>
> _______________________________________________
> nSLUG mailing list
> nSLUG at nslug.ns.ca
> http://nslug.ns.ca/mailman/listinfo/nslug
>



-- 
Oliver Doepner
http://doepner.net/
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://nslug.ns.ca/pipermail/nslug/attachments/20140228/0b3d639d/attachment.html>


More information about the nSLUG mailing list