[nSLUG] Re: Apache

Mike Spencer mspencer at tallships.ca
Fri Aug 7 00:45:26 ADT 2009


"Sheldon" <shtower at eastlink.ca> wrote:

> When I open my web browser, and type "http://localhost", I'm
> presented with the index.html test page that I put into the
> directory "/var/www/html." I have no trouble accessing my test page
> from the computer running Apache...

Well and good.

> but I can't access the page from any other computer. I tried typing
> "http://[my ip address]", and "http://[my ip adress]:80" with no
> luck.

You don't say whether "any other computer" is on your local net or one
that is connected to the internet completely independent of your local LAN.

In the former case, your server IP address would appear to your
OtherComputer as a  "non-routable" IP address such as 192.168.0.13.
I've had a problem like this when I added yet another computer to my LAN
but fail to tell the router to enlarge the range from which it will
allow connections.

But I infer that the latter case applies because you ask, "Also, I
read somewhere that some ISPs prevent people from using port 80 to run
a web server. Does anyone know if Eastlink does this?"  So are you
trying to connect from some random, routable IP address to your server
using the routable IP address by which it connects to Eastlink and the
internet?

I don't know for a fact that Eatslink blocks everything incoming but
I've tried to contact Eatslink addresses from which mail to me
originates on the (admittedly somewhat shaky) assumption that such
boxen are typically "always on" and have a more or less stable lease
on an address.  E.g. your email appears to have originated from
24.222.243.5.  I can't ping that address, can't traceroute to it,
can't telnet to it on port 80.  This has been true for addresses in
both Eatslink's 76.11.0.0/17 and in their 24.222.0.0/16. I *think*
they block all incoming connections unrelated to established
connections originated by localhost. (I'd like to know for sure one
way or the other. Anybody?)

So just to clarify things, do you observe your failed connection by, say,
running down the street to use a neighbor's machine or ssh-ing into your
employer's host (shool account, any remote account) and then trying to
connect back to your home host?  Or is this all local to your own home
LAN?


FWIW,
- Mike

-- 
Michael Spencer                  Nova Scotia, Canada       .~. 
                                                           /V\ 
mspencer at tallships.ca                                     /( )\
http://home.tallships.ca/mspencer/                        ^^-^^



More information about the nSLUG mailing list