[nSLUG] Electronics Engineering Tech/NSCC

Rich budman85 at eastlink.ca
Sat Sep 6 18:12:06 ADT 2008



Havea Notherpuff wrote:
> I am just starting a two year course at Kingstec(NSCC), taking
> Electronics Engineering Tech(EETN), I am a mature 46 year old student
> and been disabled so need to find a less labour intensive job and this
> is the one I picked, not real sure what I got myself into but find it
> hard already, but will probably click into it soon enough to make it
> through. What I was wondering is if any of you other Linux user know
> of any applications that I can make use of ; such as an electronic
> bread-board and other apps that make it so I can have sort of my own
> lab here on my computer. I usually have used Mepis  but think I might
> switch to just Debian, or what ever is the best and easiest  the best
> one with the source list for this kind of applications, I am pretty
> ignorant at this pint about anything to do with EETN, learning binary
> for first time and have never even heard of boolean algebra, but was
> told if I could do grade 12 math I could do this, hope so,LOL. Any
> help with  this subject is going to make my life   a lot easier that
> without it so please let me know about any apps you might have used or
> heard of,
>
>   

Hi

I remember using one on Win95, but now there is Virtual Breadboard that 
is for winXP.
I saw on a forum that someone recommended LTSpice, 
http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/switchercad.jsp
I'm not sure whats involved, I only touched electronics a bit when I was 
a kid.
My friend was teaching me, in return I showed him how to program. :)

Check out the IC vendors, a  lot of them offer graphical workbenches.
I remember at WEA, I think they used one called PIC or something similar 
to layout the IC's.
The testers are pretty cool.  The reason why the vendors supply the GUI, 
you click a button,
and out comes the info for your PCB, so then you just ftp to the board 
designer.

Binary.. its only 1's and 0's , on/off, wax on/wax off,  how bad can 
that get... :P
Binary math is easy when you break it down into 8 bit chunks.
Bitwise math becomes easier, you'll be amazed how fast you pickup the 
powers of 2 and 16. :)


Hope this helps
Rich






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