[nSLUG] Plems with Linux etch

David Buck davebuck at eastlink.ca
Wed Aug 22 15:17:22 ADT 2007


hi Dan,
Thanks for your advice and help
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Daniel Morrison" <draker at gmail.com>
To: "Nova Scotia Linux User Group" <nslug at nslug.ns.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2007 2:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nSLUG] Plems with Linux etch


> On 22/08/07, David Buck <davebuck at eastlink.ca> wrote:
>
>> I'm a newbie to nslug and would ask your help with a couple of
>> problems. Please see the attachment.
>> Could anyone working with etch help.
>
> Hi David, welcome to the group.
>
> First off, since your attachment is plain text, if you could have included
> it in the body of the message, that would make it easier for everyone to
> read.  Also, although it doesn't really matter what you call the file,
> using an extension like '.txt' is helpful, and bear in mind also that Unix
> folk tend not to like spaces or especially characters like '&' in file
> names.
>
> But that's not what you want to hear!  Ok, dselect.  It's horrible, don't
> use it.  (That's the quick answer).  However (even though I don't use
> etch) I have seen similar problems when trying to use dselect (on Ubuntu)
> over certain terminal emulators.
>
> Make sure you're using a capable terminal emulator.  I use 'rxvt', and
> it's got a few strange characters.  'xterm' is typically the standard.
> Here I am talking about the software.  A second concern is the TERM
> environment variable, which sets the terminal type.  Using either an rxvt
> or xterm program, make sure the TERM variable is set to 'xterm'.  when
> TERM is set to 'vt100' (which one would expect to work!!!) dselect
> produces all sorts of horrible garbage.
>
> In a reasonable sh-type shell (e.g. bash) you can type:
>
> echo $TERM
>
> to see what it's set to, and
>
> TERM=xterm
>
> to set it.  If it's not been set (unlikely!) you should export it:
>
> export TERM
>
> If you're running a csh-type shell, don't.  Type 'exec /bin/bash' to run
> bash instead.
>
> You may also get improvements if you turn off any special language or
> locale settings and use the default 'pre-internationalization' settings.
> Type:
>
> LANG=C
>
> to do this (again, in an sh-type shell like 'bash').
>
>
> Your Xwindows screen resolution problem is a whole other kettle of fish,
> which I will leave to other capable hands to debug.  However, in short,
> 640x480 is a safe resolution.  Probably the XWindow system is not able to
> communicate with your monitor, and so it rejects any other resolution as
> potentially unsafe for your hardware.  You can (perhaps) see evidence of
> this in /var/log/Xorg.0.log .  The solution is to add THE CORRECT
> horizontal and vertical timing frequencies to your /etc/X11/xorg.conf
> file. (I'm assuming all these paths are the same on Debian etch, as they
> are standard, but they potentially could be different for you!).
>
> Here's the relevant example excerpt from the Slackware /etc/X11/xorg.conf
> file:
>
> # HorizSync is in kHz unless units are specified.
> # HorizSync may be a comma separated list of discrete values, or a
> # comma separated list of ranges of values.
> # NOTE: THE VALUES HERE ARE EXAMPLES ONLY.  REFER TO YOUR MONITOR'S
> # USER MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT NUMBERS.
>
> #    HorizSync   31.5 - 50.0
>
> #    HorizSync 30-64         # multisync
> #    HorizSync 31.5, 35.2    # multiple fixed sync frequencies
> #    HorizSync 15-25, 30-50  # multiple ranges of sync frequencies
>
> # VertRefresh is in Hz unless units are specified.
> # VertRefresh may be a comma separated list of discrete values, or a
> # comma separated list of ranges of values.
> # NOTE: THE VALUES HERE ARE EXAMPLES ONLY.  REFER TO YOUR MONITOR'S
> # USER MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT NUMBERS.
>
> #    VertRefresh 40-90
>
>
> Hope this helps you out,
>
> -D.
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