[nSLUG] Plems with Linux etch

Daniel Morrison draker at gmail.com
Wed Aug 22 14:40:34 ADT 2007


On 22/08/07, David Buck <davebuck at eastlink.ca> wrote:

> I'm a newbie to nslug and would ask your help with a couple of
> problems. Please see the attachment.
> Could anyone working with etch help.

Hi David, welcome to the group.

First off, since your attachment is plain text, if you could have included
it in the body of the message, that would make it easier for everyone to
read.  Also, although it doesn't really matter what you call the file,
using an extension like '.txt' is helpful, and bear in mind also that Unix
folk tend not to like spaces or especially characters like '&' in file
names.

But that's not what you want to hear!  Ok, dselect.  It's horrible, don't
use it.  (That's the quick answer).  However (even though I don't use
etch) I have seen similar problems when trying to use dselect (on Ubuntu)
over certain terminal emulators.

Make sure you're using a capable terminal emulator.  I use 'rxvt', and
it's got a few strange characters.  'xterm' is typically the standard.
Here I am talking about the software.  A second concern is the TERM
environment variable, which sets the terminal type.  Using either an rxvt
or xterm program, make sure the TERM variable is set to 'xterm'.  when
TERM is set to 'vt100' (which one would expect to work!!!) dselect
produces all sorts of horrible garbage.

In a reasonable sh-type shell (e.g. bash) you can type:

echo $TERM

to see what it's set to, and

TERM=xterm

to set it.  If it's not been set (unlikely!) you should export it:

export TERM

If you're running a csh-type shell, don't.  Type 'exec /bin/bash' to run
bash instead.

You may also get improvements if you turn off any special language or
locale settings and use the default 'pre-internationalization' settings.
Type:

LANG=C

to do this (again, in an sh-type shell like 'bash').


Your Xwindows screen resolution problem is a whole other kettle of fish,
which I will leave to other capable hands to debug.  However, in short,
640x480 is a safe resolution.  Probably the XWindow system is not able to
communicate with your monitor, and so it rejects any other resolution as
potentially unsafe for your hardware.  You can (perhaps) see evidence of
this in /var/log/Xorg.0.log .  The solution is to add THE CORRECT
horizontal and vertical timing frequencies to your /etc/X11/xorg.conf
file. (I'm assuming all these paths are the same on Debian etch, as they
are standard, but they potentially could be different for you!).

Here's the relevant example excerpt from the Slackware /etc/X11/xorg.conf
file:

# HorizSync is in kHz unless units are specified.
# HorizSync may be a comma separated list of discrete values, or a
# comma separated list of ranges of values.
# NOTE: THE VALUES HERE ARE EXAMPLES ONLY.  REFER TO YOUR MONITOR'S
# USER MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT NUMBERS.

#    HorizSync   31.5 - 50.0

#    HorizSync 30-64         # multisync
#    HorizSync 31.5, 35.2    # multiple fixed sync frequencies
#    HorizSync 15-25, 30-50  # multiple ranges of sync frequencies

# VertRefresh is in Hz unless units are specified.
# VertRefresh may be a comma separated list of discrete values, or a
# comma separated list of ranges of values.
# NOTE: THE VALUES HERE ARE EXAMPLES ONLY.  REFER TO YOUR MONITOR'S
# USER MANUAL FOR THE CORRECT NUMBERS.

#    VertRefresh 40-90


Hope this helps you out,

-D.



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