[nSLUG] Redhat 8, Dell Dimension L500r, RTL8139

Donald Teed dteed at artistic.ca
Tue Mar 11 21:48:06 AST 2003


On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 bdavidso at supercity.ns.ca wrote:

> On Tue, 11 Mar 2003, Dean Landry wrote:
> 
> > they both throw an error saying there is no such device.  This is the output
> > from 'dmseg'.  Do the lines starting with 'PCI:' look suspicious?
> [snip]
> > PCI: PCI BIOS revision 2.10 entry at 0xfda95, last bus=1
> > PCI: Using configuration type 1
> > PCI: Probing PCI hardware
> > PCI: Unable to handle 64-bit address for device 01:08.0
> > PCI: Unable to handle 64-bit address for device 01:09.0
> > Unknown bridge resource 0: assuming transparent
> > PCI: Using IRQ router PIIX [8086/2410] at 00:1f.0
> > PCI: Cannot allocate resource region 2 of device 01:09.0
> > PCI: Cannot allocate resource region 3 of device 01:09.0
> > PCI: Cannot allocate resource region 2 of device 01:08.0
> > PCI: Failed to allocate resource 0(10000000-0) for 01:08.0
> > PCI: Error while updating region 01:08.0/2 (fc000000 != 02000000)
> > PCI: Failed to allocate resource 0(10000000-0) for 01:09.0
> > PCI: Error while updating region 01:09.0/2 (fa700000 != 02000010)
> > PCI: Error while updating region 01:09.0/3 (fa700100 != 00000100)
> 
> Not so much suspicious as alarming.  That's a lot of errors and failures
> configuring the PCI bus.

I've spent a few minutes tonight looking for something of a hint
on google.  The strange thing is that when these errors
appear in other mailing lists and so on, it is typically
with a development kernel (i.e. a bug in development code)
or someone reports kernel panics and such and there are
no follow up answers from gurus suggesting what is wrong.

The total picture looks like a problem with hardware to me.
Unless there is something configurable in your motherboard BIOS which
can overcome the problem, I'd see if it is possible
to confirm the problem is hardware.  One way to do that
is to download the software from the network card vendor
which is designed to run on a DOS boot disk and perform
internal diagnostic check on the ethernet card and potentially
run a link test between one machine and another.  I know
you said these cards worked OK with another box, and I'm assuming
the card is fine.  But this will tell you whether DOS drivers
can access the ethernet hardware.  If the DOS drivers fail as well,
you don't have a linux problem, you likely have a hardware or
physical problem of some type on the motherboard.

Unfortunately you can't get a Linux boot diskette image
from the hardware vendors, so DOS is an essential diagnostic
tool.

You could also ask the person that gave you this machine
if they had problems with it - maybe that is why they
are getting rid of it.

One other thing you could consider is checking with Dell to see
if there is a flash BIOS available that cures some ills
with the motherboard.  It might be an idea as well to try
a reset of the CMOS if there is a jumper available
for that.  Some weird problems can be fixed by resetting CMOS
(a trial of last resort).






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